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Data Sources

Temperature

  • Gridded Observed Meteorological Data

    Source: Santa Clara University: Department of Civil Engineering

    Described in some of the visualizations as "actual" temperature for 1950-2000, these data represent the historic measured temperatures for each pixel. These data are described in detail in the reference: Maurer, E.P., A.W. Wood, J.C. Adam, D.P. Lettenmaier, and B. Nijssen, 2002, A Long-Term Hydrologically-Based Data Set of Land Surface Fluxes and States for the Conterminous United States, J. Climate 15(22), 3237-3251

  • Projected Daily Temperature

    Source: Scripps Institution of Oceanography: California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP)

    Projected daily temperature data for tmax (high) and tmin (low). These data layers were downscaled using a bias correction and constructed analogues (BCCA) approach and include data for the GDFL climate model for two different scenarios (A2, B1).

  • Projected Monthly Temperature

    Source: Scripps Institution of Oceanography: California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP)

    Projected monthly temperature data for tmax (high), tair (avg), and tmin (low). These data layers were downscaled using a bias correction and spatial downscaling (BCSD) approach and include data for four different models (PCM1, CCSM3, GFDL, CNRM) for two different scenarios (A2, B1).

    For more information, view the full CEC report:
    Climate Change Scenarios and Sea Level Rise Estimates for California - 2008 Climate Change Scenarios Assessment - Final Report
    Date Published: September 2009

Snowpack

  • Projected Snow Water Equivalent

    Source: Scripps Institution of Oceanography: California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP)

    Projected monthly Snow Water Equivalent (amount of water contained within the snowpack). These data layers were downscaled using a bias correction and spatial downscaling (bcsd) approach and include data for four different models (PCM1, CCSM3, GFDL, CNRM) for two different scenarios (A2, B1).

Precipitation

  • Projected Precipitation

    Source: Scripps Institution of Oceanography: California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP)

    Projected monthly precipitation. These data layers were downscaled using a bias correction and spatial downscaling (bcsd) approach and include data for four different models (PCM1, CCSM3, GFDL, CNRM) for two different scenarios (A2, B1).

Sea Level Rise

  • Bay Area Inundation

    Source: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Sea Level Rise

    These layers represent areas around San Francisco Bay at risk of inundation, and correspond to varying amounts of long-term sea level rise (varying over decades) in conjunction with various return levels corresponding to shorter-term variability (hours to years). Most of these areas are currently behind levees or other protective structures, and would only be inundated if those structures were to fail. These data are described in detail in the reference: Knowles, Noah. 2010. Potential Inundation Due to Rising Sea Levels in the San Francisco Bay Region. San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science, 8:1. Available at

    http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=jmie_sfews;volume=8;issue=1.

  • Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS)

    Source: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

    These layers represent CoSMoS coastal flooding projections for the San Francisco Bay area due to the combination of sea level rise and storms, including waves, tides, surge, steric effects, and fluvial discharge. These data are available for comprehensive visualization and download from Our Coast, Our Future (OCOF). OCOF is a collaborative effort between Point Blue Conservation Science, USGS, the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, and Coravai LCC.

    Barnard, P.L., van Ormondt, M., Erikson, L.H., Eshleman, J., Hapke, C., Ruggiero, P., Adams, P.N. and Foxgrover, A.C., 2014. Development of the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting the impact of storms on high-energy, active-margin coasts. Natural Hazards, Volume 74 (2), p. 1095-1125, DOI:10.1007/s11069-014-1236-y

  • Pacific Institute Coastal Data

    Source: Pacific Institute

    These data include areas inundated by 100-year unimpeded Pacific coastal flooding under baseline (year 2000) conditions for the California Coastline, as well as areas inundated by 100-year unimpeded Pacific coastal flooding under a scenario of 1.4-meter (55-inch) sea-level rise.  These data are available for download via the Pacific Institute.

Wildfire

  • Fire Risk Data

    Source: UC Merced: Climate Applications Lab

    These data model the ratio of additional fire risk for an area as compared to the expected burned area for each grid cell. The ratio of additional risk was calculated for 30 year averaged periods ending 2020, 2050, and 2085, for four models (CCSM3, GFDL, PCM1, CNRM) and two scenarios (A2, B1). More detailed information about these data can be found in: Westerling, A. L., Bryant, B. P., 2008. Climate Change and Wildfire in California. Climatic Change (2008) 87 (Suppl 1): s231-s249

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