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Browse publications gathered by the California Energy Commission that focus on climate change issues relevant to the State of California. Find both PIER research papers as well as relevant articles published in peer reviewed journals.

Publications Published in 2014


  1. Maladaptation to drought: a case report from California, USA . Juliet Christian-Smith, Morgan C. Levy,Peter H. Gleick.
    Sustain Science: 2014
    DOI: DOI 10.1007/s11625-014-0269-1
    Notes
    <p><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; font-size: x-small;"> <p>The interactions between natural water availability</p> <p>and societal water demand and management are</p> <p>complex. In response to gaps in empirical research of the</p> <p>adaptive capacity of social and environmental systems to</p> <p>climate stresses, we provide an assessment of responses to</p> <p>water scarcity during a multi-year drought in California. In</p> <p>particular, we use Barnett and O&rsquo;Neill&rsquo;s (Global Environ</p> <span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; font-size: x-small;"> <p>Change 20:211&ndash;213,</p> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; color: #0000ff; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; color: #0000ff; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; color: #0000ff; font-size: x-small;">2010</span></span></span><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; font-size: x-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvPTimes; font-size: x-small;">) criteria for maladaptation to </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>examine responses in the agricultural and energy sectors to a</p> <p>multi-year (2007&ndash;2009) California drought. We conclude</p> <p>that despite evidence in both sectors of resiliency to the</p> <p>impacts of the drought, some of the coping strategies adopted</p> <p>increased the vulnerability of other systems. These other</p> <p>systems include California&rsquo;s aquatic ecosystems and social</p> <p>groups that rely on those ecosystems for their health or</p> <p>employment; future generations whose resources were drawn</p> <p>down in the near-term, where otherwise those resources</p> <p>would have been available at a later time; and current and</p> <p>future generations who were, or will be, exposed to the effects</p> <p>of increased greenhouse gas emissions. This case study</p> <p>demonstrates that California&rsquo;s current strategies for dealing</p> <p>with long or severe droughts are less successful than previously</p> <p>thought when short- and long-term impacts are evaluated</p> <p>together. This finding is particularly relevant given</p> <p>projections of more frequent and severe water shortages in the</p> <p>future due to climate change. This study recommends a shift</p> <p>from crisis-driven responses to the development and enactment</p> <p>of long-term mitigation measures that are anticipatory</p> <p>and focus on comprehensive risk reduction.</p>


  2. Mapping migration in a songbird using high-resolution genetic markers. Kristen C. Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson , Kristina L. Paxton, Vanessa Apkenas, Sirena Lao, Rodney B. Siegel, David F. Desante , Frank Moore, Thomas B. Smith .
    Molecular Ecology: 2014
    DOI: 10.1111/mec.12977

  3. Methodology for Estimating Electricity Generation Vulnerability. Matthew Bartos and Mikhail Chester.
    SCHOOL OF SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT : 2014
    http://hdl.handle.net/2286/R.I.25404

  4. Monitoring the production of Central California coastal rangelands using satellite remote sensing. Potter, Christopher.
    Springer Netherlands 1: 2014
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11852-014-0308-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s11852-014-0308-1
    Notes
    <div class="abstract-content formatted"> <p class="a">There is a long history of livestock grazing on the California Central Coast, dating back over 150&nbsp;years. In this study, methods were reviewed and results presented for analysis of NASA&rsquo;s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor data to monitor year-to-year variation of forage production on Central Coast rangelands around Big Sur, California. Time series plots from 2000 to 2012 of vegetation greenness for ten rangeland sites showed similar inter-annual patterns in satellite yield index (SYI) values. Most sites reached their maximum greenness levels each year in early May. The year with the highest observed SYI level across most sites was 2005. In the northern portion of the region (north of Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park), 2007 was the year with the lowest observed SYI level, whereas in the southern allotments, 2007 was a year with a relatively high SYI level. These methods have the potential to monitor the differing seasonal growing cycles of rangeland production across the area of individual grazing allotments on the Central Coast. Such a cost-effective and timely approach is required for conservation monitoring in the Big Sur coastal ecosystems where rapid climate change may shift vegetation cover in favor of more extensive rangelands at the expense of forested lands.</p> </div>


  5. Mountain runoff vulnerability to increased. Michael L. Gouldena, Roger C. Balesb,.
    aDepartment of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine : 2014

  6. Nut crop yield records show that budbreak-based chilling requirements may not reflect yield decline chill thresholds. Katherine S. Pope, Volker Dose, David Da Silva, Patrick H. Brown, and Theodore M. DeJong.
    International Journal of Biometeorol: 2014
    DOI: 10.1007/s00484-014-0881-x

  7. Projecting regional change . Alex Hall.
    Science: 2014

  8. Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental quality and health and associated no-regrets mitigation measures. William J. Fisk.
    Building and Environment: 2014
    Notes
    <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>This paper reviews the potential health consequences of changes in climate that affect indoor environments,</p> <p>with an emphasis on residential environments in the U.S. and Europe. These changes in</p> <p>climate, include increases in the frequency and severity of heat waves, severe storms coupled with sea</p> <span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>level rise, and wild</p> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fl</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>fi</p> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">ltration systems could reduce the health effects of particles from wild</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb+fb; font-size: xx-small;">fi</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">ciency </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>in order to mitigate climate change, has to potential to either improve or worsen indoor environmental</p> <p>quality and health.</p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">res. Some of these measures will </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>also reduce building energy use and the associated emissions of greenhouse gases. Most of these</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>measures would improve health irrespective of climate change. Improvements in building energy ef</p> </span></p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">ect more solar energy, and more air conditioning to reduce indoor overheating. Improved particle</span></p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">ed that could reduce the projected </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>adverse health effects of climate change. Examples include improved roof insulation, roof coatings that</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>re</p> </span></p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">cant </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>extent, indoors. The adverse health effects will be substantially mediated by features of buildings,</p> <p>particularly of homes where people, particularly those most susceptible, spend the largest amount of</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>time. Changes to buildings, or to building operations, are identi</p> </span></p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">res, and increased mortality<span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>and hospitalizations associated with ozone. The associated adverse exposures occur, to a signi</p> </span></span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;">res, plus increases in urban airborne ozone. The potential for adverse health effects is </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>substantial. Examples of projected effects include a doubling of heat-related deaths, increased hospitalizations</p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT863180fb; font-size: xx-small;"> <p>for asthma, pneumonia, and cardiovascular effects during wild</p> </span></p>


  9. Sea Level Rise and Nuisance Flood Frequency Changes around the United States . .
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration : 2014

  10. Simulating High-Elevation Hydropower with Regional Simulating High-Elevation Hydropower with RegionalSimulating High-Elevation Hydropower with RegionalSimulating High-Elevation Hydropower with Regional Climate Warming in the West Slope, Sierra Nevada. David E. Rheinheimer; Joshua H. Viers; Jack Sieber; Michael Kiparsky; Vishal K. Mehta and Scott T. Ligare.
    American Society of Civil Engineers : 2014
    DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000373
    Notes
    <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203; font-size: x-small;"> <p>Water systems in snowmelt-dominated hydroregions such as California</p> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203+20; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203+20; font-size: x-small;">&rsquo;</span></span><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203; font-size: x-small;"> </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p><span style="font-family: AdvOT483a8203; font-size: x-small;">s Sierra Nevada mountains are sensitive to regional </span> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p>climate change, hydropower systems in particular. In this study, a water resources management model was developed for the upper west</p> <p>slope Sierra Nevada to understand the potential effects of regional climate warming on hydropower at the watershed scale, a scale that has</p> <p>been largely neglected but is important for hydroregional planning. The model is developed with the Water Evaluation and Planning system</p> <p>(WEAP) and includes most water management infrastructure in the study region. Hydropower is simulated assuming historical long-term</p> <p>electricity demand and a spill minimization rule. The method is suitable for simulating generation for most of the main watersheds in the</p> <p>region. To assess the potential effect of climate warming, uniform air temperature increases of 0&deg;C, 2&deg;C, 4&deg;C, and 6&deg;C were considered, with</p> <p>no change in precipitation, to approximate regional warming through 2100. The highly productive northern Sierra Nevada sees large reductions</p> <p>in hydropower generation with decreases in annual runoff. The central watersheds see less reduction in annual runoff and can adapt</p> <p>better to changes in runoff timing. Generation in southern watersheds, which are less productive, decreases. Results from this study can help</p> <p>identify which watersheds might easily adapt to climate change, where hydropower is likely to conflict with other uses, and where more</p> <p>detailed operational studies are needed</p>


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