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48

This site represents only a subset of projects. Please see agency publications for official budget figures.

The State of California has been supporting regional climate change research for more than a decade. These studies have complemented research at the national level and have been designed to inform climate policy deliberations and actions in California. This Research Catalog provides basic information about past and ongoing climate change related studies that state agencies have conducted or commissioned since the early 2000s. The purpose of this catalog is to document California’s research efforts and to facilitate the exchange of information.

To find out more about these projects, please click here to obtain contact information for representatives from different state agencies.

All Research Projects

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  1. 1) An Examination of Sensitive Subgroups in the Association Between Increases in Temperature and Mortality. 2) The Direct Health Effects of the July 2006 Heat Wave. 3) The Effects of Temperature Increases on Hospital Admissions in California
    Lead Agency: OEHHA in collaboration with CDPH
    Principal Investigator(s): Bart Ostro (OEHHA)
    Year finished: 2008, Budget: $70,000
    Published/Product: published in American Journal of Epidemiology 2008; 168: 632 - 637

  2. 2008 ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCB
    Principal Investigator(s): Rachel Morello-Frosch (UCB)
    Year finished: 2008, Budget: $50,000
    Notes
    Contractor will conduct a review and systematization of the pertinent literature on environmental justice impacts of climate change, with an emphasis on communities of color and low income groups.


  3. Adaptation options for California's natural and managed ecosystems
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): David Ackerly (Uc Berkeley), Craig Moritz (Uc Berkeley), Max Moritz (Uc Berkeley), Jim Thorne (Uc Davis), Erika Zavaleta (Uc Santa Cruz), Lee Hannah (Uc Santa Barbara), Peter Moyle (Uc Davis), Anthony Westerling (Uc Merced) And Louise Jackson (Uc Davis), (The Regents of the University of California/CIEE)
    Year finished: 2013, Budget: $1,257,586
    Published/Product: 500-09-037
    Notes
    This study proposes to use current scientific models on the geographical distribution of species, wildfire and urban growth in future climates to identify vulnerable species, and ecosystems. The vulnerability analyses conducted in this study will help to identify strategies to ameliorate the negative effects of climate change and provide adaptation strategies at a regional level.


  4. Adaptation Strategies for Agricultural Sustainability in Yolo County, California
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Louise Jackson (UC Davis)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $290,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2012-032
    Notes
    This place‐based case study in an agricultural county in California’s Central Valley focused on the period of 2010–2050, and dealt with biophysical and socioeconomic issues related to both mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to adaptation to an uncertain climate. In the past 100 years, changes in crop acreage has been more related to crop price and availability of irrigation water than to growing degree days during summer, and in fact, summer temperatures have increased less than winter temperatures. Econometric analysis indicated that warmer winters, as projected by Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory‐Bias Corrected Constructed Analog during 2035–2050, could result in less wheat acreage, more alfalfa and tomato acreage, and slight effects on tree and vine crops. The Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) model showed that these econometric projections did not reduce irrigation demand under either the B1 or A2 scenarios, but a diverse, water‐efficient cropping pattern combined with improved irrigation technology reduced demand to 12 percent below the historic mean. Collaboration during development of Yolo County’s Climate Action Plan showed that nitrous oxide (mainly from nitrogen fertilizers) was the main source (≅40 percent) of agricultural emissions. Emissions from cropland and rangeland were several orders of magnitude lower than urbanized land per unit area. A survey distributed to 570 farmers and ranchers achieved a 34 percent response rate. Farmers concerned about climate change were more likely to implement water conservation practices, and adopt voluntary GHG mitigation practices. Use of the urban growth model (UPlan) showed that channeling much or all future urban development into existing urban areas will increase ecosystem services by preserving agricultural land and open space, immensely reducing the Yolo County’s GHG emissions, and greatly enhancing agricultural sustainability. 500-09-009


  5. Advanced modeling of the biological effects of climate change and land use planning in California
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Lee Hannah (UC Santa Barbara)
    Year finished: 2012, Budget: $300,000
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2014-056
    Notes
    Climate change is causing shifts in species’ ranges and the timing of biological events worldwide. These biological events coupled with extensive physical alterations form part of the evidence base for human‐induced climate change. These changes cause fundamental challenges to biological systems that affect conservation and management systems, posing threats including changes in fire regimes and extinction risk. A new generation of research tools is emerging to help improve the understanding of these threats and how to handle them. Researchers are developing tools to better understand system dynamics and the possible effects of micro‐climates and fine‐scale changes. These tools represent significant advances over first‐generation climate change biology models, which were generally static and coarse scale (tens to hundreds of kilometers). This report summarized progress made in developing three new types of tools for dynamic and fine‐scale biological modeling. Fine‐scale models were developed on scales of tens of meters for the first time for California plant species. These models were tested against models at scales of hundreds of meters and kilometers and significant differences were detected. A conservation planning tool known as Network Flow analysis was refined to run using large numbers of species, allowing identification of important conservation areas taking into consideration more than 1,000 native California plant species. A dynamic modeling tool called BioMove was further enhanced to simulate California fire regimes. These advances helped provide tools for California’s conservationists and land managers to plan for climate change. They were made publicly available on a website, allowing easy access for professionals wishing to learn how to use them or to access the thousands of plant species distribution models that were prepared for use with these tools. 500-08-020


  6. Advanced Plug-In Electric Vehicle Usage and Charging Behavior
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Tom Turrentine (UCD)
    Year finished: 2013
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65206
    Notes
    The objective of this research project is to collect and analyze longitudinal and spatial in-use vehicle data from households that own PEVs. A wide array of data will be collected from all vehicles within the households – both PEV and non-PEV – in order to improve emissions estimates at the vehicle, household, and fleet levels. The data will also be used to inform potential demand on the electrical grid as well as the need for potential future supporting infrastructure.


  7. AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS AND SOURCE IDENTIFICATION IN SUPPORT OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SULFUR STUDY COMPANION TO CALNEX 2010
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCD
    Principal Investigator(s): Wexler (UCD)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $320,000
    Notes
    CONDUCT SAMPLING USING ROTATING DRUM IMPACTORS AS PART OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SULFUR STUDY BEING CONDUCTED BY ARB STAFF, AND DELIVER FIELD DATA AND QUALITY ASSURANCE RESULTS TO ARB.


  8. A FIELD EXPERIMENT TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF INFORMATION PROVISION ON HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCLA
    Principal Investigator(s): Mathew E. Kahn (UCLA)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $322,003
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=64843
    Notes
    THE CONTRACTOR WILL CONDUCT AN ORIGINAL RESEARCH PROJECT TO ILLUMINATE THE IMPACT OF VOLUNTARY MEASURES DESIGNED TO REDUCE RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION. THE CONTRACTOR WILL DESIGN AND IMPLEMENT SEVERAL INTERVENTIONS TO HELP RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS REDUCE ELECTRICITY USE (E.G. PROVISION OF INFORMATION REGARD CONSUMPTION AND MEANS OF REDUCING CONSUMPTION), WORK WITH A UTILITY TO IMPLEMENT THE INTERVENTION IN A RANDOMLY SELECTED SUBSET OF CUSTOMERS, AND CARRY OUT COMPLEX SPATIAL AND ECONOMETRIC ANALYSES TO DETERMINE THE EFFICIENCY IN REDUCING HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION AS WELL AS COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF THE EFFORT.


  9. Air and water impacts from direct land application of un-composted green waste
    Lead Agency: Cal Recycle in collaboration with ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Peter G. Green (UC Davis, Civil & Environmental Engineering)
    Year finished: 2015, Budget: $175,000
    Notes
    As pressure for direct land application of un-composted green waste increases, the potential air quality and water quality impacts need to be determined.


  10. AIRBORNE AND GROUND-BASED WHOLE AIR SAMPLING DURING CALNEX 2010
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCI
    Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Donald Blake (UCI)
    Year finished: 2009, Budget: $447,456
    Notes
    CALNEX 2010 : Collection of whole air samples and subsequent laboratory analysis to quantify concentrations of an extensive suite of chemicals important as greenhouse gases and precursors of photochemical smog. Samples will be collected in canisters at ground sites and on a research aircraft that is contributed by NOAA.


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