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Count for all projects in 2010

Impact and Adaptation Studies 160
Regional Climate Analysis and Modeling 88
GHG Emissions Reduction 83
GHG Inventory Methods 61
others 89
481

This site represents only a subset of projects. Please see agency publications for official budget figures.

The State of California has been supporting regional climate change research for more than a decade. These studies have complemented research at the national level and have been designed to inform climate policy deliberations and actions in California. This Research Catalog provides basic information about past and ongoing climate change related studies that state agencies have conducted or commissioned since the early 2000s. The purpose of this catalog is to document California’s research efforts and to facilitate the exchange of information.

To find out more about these projects, please click here to obtain contact information for representatives from different state agencies.

Search results for 2010 Research Projects

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  1. AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS AND SOURCE IDENTIFICATION IN SUPPORT OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SULFUR STUDY COMPANION TO CALNEX 2010
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCD
    Principal Investigator(s): Wexler (UCD)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $320,000
    Notes
    CONDUCT SAMPLING USING ROTATING DRUM IMPACTORS AS PART OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SULFUR STUDY BEING CONDUCTED BY ARB STAFF, AND DELIVER FIELD DATA AND QUALITY ASSURANCE RESULTS TO ARB.


  2. ARE THERE ANY COUNTERACTING EFFECTS THAT REDUCE THE GLOBAL WARMING BENEFITS ATTRIBUTED TO DIESEL AND OTHER BLACK CARBON CONTROLS
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCSD
    Principal Investigator(s): Russell (UCSD)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $114,751
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=64856
    Notes
    REDACTING BC EMISSIONS IS A VIABLE CONTROL STRATEGY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE PROTECTION THAT IS EXPECTED TO HAVE AN IMMEDIATE AND REGIONAL IMPACT. POLICY MAKERS AND AIR QUALITY REGULATORS ARE SEEKING BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAGNITUDE AND IMPORTANCE OF THE BC RADIATIVE IMPACTS AND THE SUBSEQUENT CLIMATE RESPONSE IN ORDER TO BETTER ASSESS THE ROLE OF BS IN THE CONTROL PROGRAMS. THIS PROJECT WILL PROVIDE USEFUL NEW MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF IMMEDIATE VALUE FOR UNDERSTANDING THE PATHWAYS BY WHICH BC MAY BE IMPORTANT IN CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WILL ENHANCE THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR POLICY.


  3. Biomove
    Lead Agency: Cal Fire in collaboration with UC Santa Barabara - Bren School for the Environment
    Principal Investigator(s): Chris Keithley; Lee Hannah (CALFIRE; UC Santa Barbara)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $22,000
    Published/Product: GIS database of predicted species range; 2010 Forest & Range Assessment report
    Notes
    For a select set of tree species a climate change model BIOMOVE was applied, using downscaled climate data, to predict potential shifts in species ranges based on future climate scenarios


  4. California's Energy Future: Assessing our Technical Capacity to meet 2050 Climate and Energy Goals
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Jane Long (California Council on Science and Technology)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $50,000
    Published/Product: 500-08-045
    Notes
    This study will assess the ability of existing energy technologies to meet California's climate and energy goals for 2050, identify technical energy gaps that need to be filled to meet these goals, and technical pathways that will help us achieve these goals.


  5. CalTrans Demonstration Projects, Workshops & Outreach on Compost-Based Best Management Practices
    Lead Agency: Cal Recycle in collaboration with CalTrans and Local Governments
    Principal Investigator(s): Bill Baker (Regents of the University of California Riverside)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $200,000
    Published/Product: http://www.ciwmb.ca.gov/Organics/Erosion/Workshops/2008/Default.htm
    Notes
    To conduct outreach to Caltrans and other governmental agencies on compost-based BMPs. These agencies have the potential to increase their compost use by hundreds of thousands of cubic yards per year for erosion control, vegetation establishment, and water filtration. This research project will encourage increased compost production that will result in the diversion of additional organic materials from landfills.


  6. CEC-NOAA Study: Winter 2009
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Prather, Kimberley (Scripps Institution of Oceanography - UC San Diego)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $140,000
    Published/Product: BOA-99-216-P
    Notes
    Under this project, Scripps measured single particle size and chemistry in the Sierra mountain range along Interstate-80 in northern California for a period of about two weeks. Two aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometers will be operated at a site co-located with other NOAA measurements. Single particle measurements will provide insight into the fraction of particles as a function of size that come from different sources. Specific sources of interest include biomass burning (i.e. wood smoke), ships, cars, trucks, dust, and sea spray. These represent the typical sources sampled in many other studies, but other local sources unique to this region may also be identified. Other new measurements will also be added including studies of the CN insoluble residues in rainwater and snow melt samples, as well as studies of the chemistry of individual activated CCN particles using a pumped CVI. A key aspect of using single particle analysis is we will be able to study the impact of different major sources of pollution in California with weather eventsâ€"single particle analysis allows us to apportion the sources with high time resolution and correlate sources in the aerosols with cloud formation and rain/snow chemistry. This will be the first time source apportionment is used to probe the full cycling of the water process. The PIER climate change water and climate change sub-programs will conduct a major field study in the winter of 2010-2011. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) would contribute with three to four million dollars in equipment and personnel. Given the potential substantial investments that NOAA and the Energy Commission’s PIER program will incur, it is prudent to conduct proof-of-concept studies prior to the major field campaign to minimize the risk of failure. This research project is one of such early deployment and testing of equipment to make sure the potential major field study is a success.


  7. Characterizing A/C Refrigerant Emissions from Heavy-Duty On and Off Road Vehicles in California
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Rick Baker (Eastern Research Group)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $148,513
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=64773
    Notes
    INVESTIGATORS WILL DEVELOP AN INVENTORY OF REFRIGERANT EMISSIONS FROM THE AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS OF ON AND OFF ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES OF ALL CLASSES, OTHER THAN LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES (LDVs), IN CALIFORNIA. THIS STUDY WILL CHARACTERIZE THE AC TECHNOLOGIES USED IN THE VARIOUS VEHICLE CLASSES, WITH EMPHASIS ON THE TECHNOLOGIES CURRENTLY OR SOON TO BE USED IN NEW VEHICLES.


  8. Climate Change and California's Energy Infrastructure: Phase I
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Sathaye, Jayant (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $386,506
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2012-057
    Notes
    As the projected impacts of climate change are becoming ever more apparent via expanding scientific research efforts, understanding the potential vulnerabilities of and possible adaptation measures for energy infrastructure under the changing climate conditions is becoming increasingly urgent. In February 2008, the U.S. Climate Change Science Program released a Synthesis and Assessment Product entitled "Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States." The California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program's body of work was heavily cited in this report and used as an example of what should be done for other states. At the same time, the report uncovered several areas of research on energy impacts that need attention, including the following: 1) potential decrease of generation efficiency of power plants due to high ambient temperatures; 2) potential reductions of generating capacity due to increased temperatures of cooling medium (e.g., water from rivers) used in the cooling part of the power cycle; 3) potential decrease of capacity of transmission lines; 4) potential disruptions in the supply of energy (e.g., natural gas) from outside sources that would be affected by climate change (e.g., the natural gas platforms at risk in the Gulf region of the United States due to the potential increase of hurricane activity). In addition, other potential effects of climate change on energy infrastructure include: 1) catastrophic failures of the levee system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta where underground natural storage facilities and other important energy infrastructures is located, and 2) impacts of sea level rise on coastal power plants. This research effort attempts to preliminarily quantify risk to California's energy infrastructure from projected climate change. For the purposes of this study, energy infrastructure includes the state's power generation facilities, electric transmission and distribution system, energy storage facilities, and oil/natural gas pipelines. This project is being funded by the PIER program and will build on earlier work by the California Energy Commission (CEC) entitled Climate Change on California's Energy Infrastructure and Identification of Adaptation Measures (Perez, 2009). BOA-99-221-P-R


  9. Climate Monitoring, Modeling, and Analyses: Phase III and 2008 Scenarios Impact and Adaptation Study
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Cayan, Dan (Scripps Institution of Oceanography - UC San Diego)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $2,289,016
    Published/Product: 500-07-017
    Notes
    Ongoing research which entails installing and running meteorological and hydrological stations in key areas in the state, enhancing the available climatic and hydrologic records and investigating climate extremes. This reseach leads to the preparation of the 2008 Scenarios Study for the Climate Action Team.


  10. Compost Best Management Practices and Benefits
    Lead Agency: Cal Recycle
    Principal Investigator(s): David M. Crohn (Regents of the University of California Riverside)
    Year finished: 2010, Budget: $150,000
    Published/Product: http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publications/default.asp?pubid=1377
    Notes
    Conducted research on the benefits of compost and mulch and quantified the benefits by studying compost-based Best Management Practices (BMP) in a field demonstration setting on fire-ravaged land and also on plots simulating a post-construction site.


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