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Count for all projects in 2011

Impact and Adaptation Studies 160
Regional Climate Analysis and Modeling 88
GHG Emissions Reduction 83
GHG Inventory Methods 61
others 89
481

This site represents only a subset of projects. Please see agency publications for official budget figures.

The State of California has been supporting regional climate change research for more than a decade. These studies have complemented research at the national level and have been designed to inform climate policy deliberations and actions in California. This Research Catalog provides basic information about past and ongoing climate change related studies that state agencies have conducted or commissioned since the early 2000s. The purpose of this catalog is to document California’s research efforts and to facilitate the exchange of information.

To find out more about these projects, please click here to obtain contact information for representatives from different state agencies.

Search results for 2011 Research Projects

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  1. A FIELD EXPERIMENT TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF INFORMATION PROVISION ON HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCLA
    Principal Investigator(s): Mathew E. Kahn (UCLA)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $322,003
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=64843
    Notes
    THE CONTRACTOR WILL CONDUCT AN ORIGINAL RESEARCH PROJECT TO ILLUMINATE THE IMPACT OF VOLUNTARY MEASURES DESIGNED TO REDUCE RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION. THE CONTRACTOR WILL DESIGN AND IMPLEMENT SEVERAL INTERVENTIONS TO HELP RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS REDUCE ELECTRICITY USE (E.G. PROVISION OF INFORMATION REGARD CONSUMPTION AND MEANS OF REDUCING CONSUMPTION), WORK WITH A UTILITY TO IMPLEMENT THE INTERVENTION IN A RANDOMLY SELECTED SUBSET OF CUSTOMERS, AND CARRY OUT COMPLEX SPATIAL AND ECONOMETRIC ANALYSES TO DETERMINE THE EFFICIENCY IN REDUCING HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION AS WELL AS COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF THE EFFORT.


  2. AIR MOVEMENT AS AN ENERGY EFFICIENT MEANS TOWARD OCCUPANT COMFORT
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCB
    Principal Investigator(s): Edward Arens (UCB)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $170,000
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65024
    Notes
    (1) Contractor (principal investigators) would use advanced personal environmental control system (PEC) instruments (such as fans/misters) and equipment available to the contractor through Center for Built Environment (CBE) and thermal manikins and anemometers to arrive at optimum air movements and cooling effects. With these PEC systems in place, assess the physiological consequences of having the building temperature set point higher during the warmer seasons, (2) Using human subjects and selected PEC instruments, characterize exposure to higher temperature set points and personal human subject use of PEC in a controlled environment chamber. Assuring human subject satisfaction, experiment with optimum energy savings and highest central temperature set point, (3) For example buildings in southern and northern California, simulate the energy saving potential of shifting the building operation strategy from strict temperature conditioning to higher indoor temperatures and increased air movement, and (4) In collaboration with industry, suggest efficient PEC prototypes that are either stand alone devices or integrated into architecture systems.


  3. A Spatial Synoptic Classification Approach to Projected Heat Vulnerability in California Under Future Climate Change Scenarios
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Scott Sheridan (Kent State)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $191,553
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=64809
    Notes
    This project builds on previous research regarding heat warning systems by Dr. Sheridan and Dr. Laurence Kalkstein.


  4. Assessing Long-term Dynamics of Bird Distributions in Relation to Climate Change: From Grinnell to Present
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Steve Beissinger (UC Berkeley)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $199,999
    Published/Product: http://energy.ca.gov/publications/displayOneReport.php?pubNum=CEC-500-2014-080
    Notes
    Certain renewable energy technologies, such as solar and wind, can use large areas of land and may have ecological impacts that must be mitgated, for example, setting aside other areas of similar ecological importance. Current analyses assume that historical distribution of species can inform the selection of the mitigation areas. However, climate change invalidates this assumption. For this reason, ecological impacts and mitigation efforts should consider how climate change will affect the distrubtion of flora and fauna. Scientists expect ranges of many species to shift dramatically with future climate change. Long‐term range shifts and species colonization and extinction (turnover) events are best understood by comparing historical surveys to modern surveys. The authors used mean annual temperature and annual precipitation data to test for effects of climate change and land use change over the last 100 years on the distribution patterns of 100 breeding bird species, primarily songbirds. Joseph Grinnell and colleagues first surveyed sites along a 1,000 km north‐south transect in the California Coast Ranges between 1911 and 1940. The authors resurveyed 70 of these sites for this project in 2009 and 2010. Occupancy models were used to estimate detectability and sitelevel measures of occupancy, colonization, and extinction between the two survey periods. With a better understanding of sensitivity of birds to climate change and land‐use, wildlife managers and energy industry planners will effectively know which indicators to consider when planning for the preservation of birds and locating power generation facilities. Advanced planning for conservation areas will help energy providers site new facilities more quickly and economically, as well as decrease negative impacts on California’s wildlife. PIR-08-001


  5. BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES TO REAL-TIME INDIVIDUAL ENERGY USAGE INFORMATION: A LARGE SCALE EXPERIMENT
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UCB
    Principal Investigator(s): Magali Delmas (UCB)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $300,004
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65039
    Notes
    THIS PROJECT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER AND TO WHAT EXTENT REAL-TIME, EASILY ACCESSIBLE ENERGY USAGE INFORMATION AND FINANCIAL OR OTHER INCENTIVES RESULT IN SIGNIFICANT REDUCTIONS IN ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN A FIELD STUDY; AND INVESTIGATE HOW BEST TO PRESENT ELECTRICITY USAGE INFORMATION TO CONSUMERS IN AN EFFORT TO INDUCE CONSERVATION ACTIONS THROUGH INTERVENTIONS THAT FOCUS ON SOCIAL NORMS AND STATUS/REPUTATION EFFECTS.


  6. CALIBRATING, VALIDATING, AND IMPLEMENTING PROCESS MODELS FOR CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS
    Lead Agency: ARB in collaboration with UNH
    Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Changsheng Li (UNH)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $249,688
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65025
    Notes
    THIS PROJECT WILL SIMULATE NITROUS OXIDE (N2O) AND METHANE (CH4) EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL SOILS USING GEOCHEMICAL MODELING BASED ON CALIFORNIA SPECIFIC SOIL, CROP, METEOROLOGICAL, AND MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS. THE CONTRACTOR WILL DEVELOP SPATIAL AND AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT DATA, LINK THESE DATA WITH GEOCHEMICAL PROCESS MODELS FOR AGRICULTURAL N2O AND CH4 EMISSION ESTIMATION, AND TRANSFER THIS INFORMATION TO ARB FOR ITS FUTURE USE OF EMISSION AND MITIGATION ASSESSMENT.


  7. California Energy Balances Phase II
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Masanet, Eric (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $249,895
    Published/Product: MRA-02-079
    Notes
    Ongoing research to update and improve the California Energy Balance (CALEB) database which provides reliable and concise energy statistics for energy policy analysis and forecasting.


  8. California's Carbon Challenge: An Integrated Modeling Framework to Reduce GHG Emissions in California by 2050
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Mcmahon, James (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $400,000
    Published/Product: PIR-08-009
    Notes
    Ongoing research to create an integrated modeling framework to analyze and compare options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California. Report pending.


  9. Climate Change and Sea Level Rise: Implications for the California Coast
    Lead Agency: CEC
    Principal Investigator(s): Peter Adams And Doug Inman (University of Florida, Scripps)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $599,625
    Published/Product: 500-06-002
    Notes
    Ongoing research in climate change, sea level rise, and implications for the California Coast. Measurement of cliff erosion and coastal landslide are proposed. The data is proposed for use in testing a coastal evolution model. Report pending.


  10. Cool California Carbon Challenge: A Pilot Intra-Inter-Community Carbon Footprint Reduction
    Lead Agency: ARB
    Principal Investigator(s): Daniel Kammen (UCB)
    Year finished: 2011, Budget: $300,004
    Published/Product: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/single-project.php?row_id=65036
    Notes
    This project aims to develop, monitor, and evaluate a carbon footprint reduction program for California households and communities that is based on ARB’s CoolCalifornia.org website and toolkit and that leverages a variety of proven strategies to motivate behavioral change.


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